CGPR adopts only to those who provide secure, stable, and visible fencing or, occasionally (and depending on the needs of the specific Pyr), to those who agree to leash-walk their Pyr. We appreciate there are great dog owners who don’t have solid fencing, but we require a solid fence because it is in the best interests of our Pyrs.

Most Pyrs have a strong roaming instinct, which is hardwired into them through generations of working as livestock guardians. Given the chance, most will bolt — that’s their nature. They generally will not come when called and cannot be kept off-leash. Likewise, Pyrs tend to be happiest when they have an area to patrol. They like to dig pits, lay in them, and supervise their world. For their safety and the safety of other animals and people in the neighborhood, that has to occur in a fenced yard. A neighboring dog or stranger who comes up to a Pyr on a tie-out or through an invisible fence is in danger. A Pyr is a guardian, and its instinct is to protect, and that’s as true of our loving pets as it is of their working dog cousins.

Since the introduction of invisible fencing, we have taken in multiple dogs with injuries caused by the collars. For example, in December 2012, a family surrendered their Pyr, whom they couldn’t contain in their invisibly fenced yard. (This is a common reason that owners sign over dogs to us and accounts for about 5% of our intake each year.) What seemed like a typical surrender turned into a veterinary emergency. The Pyr arrived in rescue with severe burns around its neck and upper chest from a shock collar (pictures below). This dog’s skin was infected under his fur — there’s no telling for how long. The below pictures were taken after the removal of the fur and treatment. You can only imagine how this looked (and felt) prior to this dog receiving veterinary care. We’ve also taken in multiple Pyrs severely injured after bolting through the fencing and being hit by a car and from fighting another dog who came into their yard. Moreover, we have taken in dogs traumatized by shock collars and who no longer feel safe and secure being outside. We have seen the behavior this trainer describes repeatedly: http://www.coldnosecollege.com/shocking-didnt-know/.

We once had an open mind about this technology, but we have now seen so many of the negative outcomes that under no circumstances will we place a dog in a home where unsafe and inhumane methods will be used to restrain the Pyr.

Click on image to enlarge

Click on image to enlarge